What you should know aboout COVID-19

With all the COVID-19 situations going on around our nation, many businesses and communities are taking precautions. I received this information that you all might find interesting and helpful when it comes to our communities and businesses.

"AMIBA is always concerned about the health and well-being of our local and global communities. The US Center for Disease Control has noted that the advice for prevention of communicable airborne diseases, which includes both COVID-19 and conventional influenza, has not changed. Take normal precautions against infection by washing your hands, covering coughs into your elbows, and staying home when sick.

Communicable diseases can affect independent businesses and local economies in a variety of ways, including loss of in-person customers and impacts on employees and owners. But by working together as a community we can lessen these impacts.  

Here is what most medical experts on virus epidemics agree about regarding the facts of this new strain of the coronavirus: In the articles below you will find important ideas about how to help bring continued health and well-being to everyone in our communities.  

The 'Big Five Antivirus Hygiene Habits’

The spread of the coronavirus can be prevented if we take the right measures personally and as a community. Please read and remind yourself, your employees and your customers of five practices that we already know can make a big difference.  

  • ·Perhaps the most important advice is towash your hands frequently, with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. 
  • ·Do not touch your face(eyes, mouth, or nose) unless you have thoroughly washed your hands. (It’s important to develop a habit of not touching your face randomly). 
  • ·Cover your mouth with your elbow when sneezing or coughing.(if you use a tissue, dispose of it carefully; droplets with the virus can fly into the air.) Don’t be a 'hand-cougher.’  
  • ·If you have flu-like symptoms of cough, shortness of breath, or fever, stay home(It’s better for you and for the people in your lives even if it’s not a coronavirus).
  • ·If you need to be with someone who has the flu or flu-like symptoms,stay at least six feet away at all times from the infected person. 

There is one action that is not recommended--wearing masks.

What can Independent Businesses do to prevent the spread of the coronavirus?

Businesses, government agencies, nonprofits, and other organizations can adopt specific practices to help prevent the spread of this virus:

           

  • ·Move from doing deep cleaning to performing deep disinfecting every night and during the day in restrooms, kitchens, and other surfaces where people may have placed their hands, sneezed, or coughed.
  • ·Make hand sanitize bottles available at key locations, including welcome or check-in desks, cash registers and counters, food pick-up stations, and doors and entryways. 
  • ·Ask users of items such as shopping baskets, cardio equipment, customer-operated machinery, etc. to use sanitizing wipes on handles and interfaces before using them.  
  • ·Encourage and support employees to stay home if they have flu-like symptoms of coughing, sneezing, shortness of breath, or a fever, and request that customers do the same.
  • ·Actively encourage employees, customers and others to adopt all of the Big Five Anti-Virus Hygiene Habits listed above. This may include training staff on methods to avoid spreading communicable diseases and posting materials, such as the CDC poster `Stop the Spread of Germs’, to promote healthy habits.
  • ·Keep abreast of current developments and inform customers, staff and community of locally-relevant news and public health recommendations.

Products that will Kill Viruses

While coronavirus diseases are not new (common influenzas are in the same family) the virus that is affecting thousands today is a new version of the virus. Disinfectant products that have been determined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to be effective against coronavirus in the past are thought to be effective for this version of the virus. While EPA officials believe these disinfectants will be effective against the novel coronavirus, tests have yet to be completed that confirmed the disinfectants are able to kill this virus.

The Center for Biocide Chemistries (CBC) has created a list of more than 100 ready-to-use, dilutable and wipeable biocidal products that the EPA has approved as effective at killing viruses like the coronavirus on a wide variety of different surfaces.